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Levels of Mental Health Care

Posted by Collaborative Counseling

There are many different program options for addressing issues with mental health. It can be difficult to know which type would be the best fit for you or a loved one. We are going to try to break down the levels of mental health care to make it a little simpler!

Outpatient Options

In outpatient care, the patient goes to the place of service, gets said service, and then goes back home all in one day. There are four levels of outpatient care: 12-Step programs, routine outpatient programs, intensive outpatient programs, and partial hospitalization.

12-Step Programs

12 step level of mental health care

In a 12-Step program, participants typically meet on a weekly or monthly basis to talk in a group about shared struggles. People share their experiences and build a support community through those stories. Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is one really common example of this type of service. Other subject areas include gambling, sex addition, eating disorders, and many more.

Routine Outpatient Care

Routine outpatient care is what we do here at Collaborative Counseling. In this level of mental health care, patients meet with a therapist in an office. Sessions typically last around an hour. Therapists will facilitate conversation to help with whatever may be happening in their life.

Intensive Outpatient Programs

outpatient level of mental health care

Intensive outpatient programs are similar to routine care in that the client goes to an office for services. However, these programs often involve both group therapy and individual therapy on a regular basis. The sessions are typically longer or occur more often.

Partial Hospitalization

Partial hospitalization (PHP) is one step higher in care. These programs are usually all day. The client would spend their day in different therapy sessions and/or programs and then go home for the night. There is more structure and help with basic care needs.

Inpatient Options

These levels of care take place in a hospital or residential setting. People typically check to a hospital or another facility where they spend the night. The two levels of inpatient care are: acute inpatient care and residential treatment.

Acute Inpatient Care

Acute inpatient care is a short term hospitalization. When care in an outpatient setting is not enough, clients can go to an inpatient facility. Facilities are staffed 24 hours a day by trained individuals monitoring client. The goal is usually to get the client stable enough to go back home.

Residential Treatment

Residential Treatment options last a bit longer than acute care. They take place in a home or apartment setting. There are still medically trained staff present, but they may not be monitoring the client as close as in a hospital. Clients work on building community in their living space while addressing their personal concerns.

No matter where you are at in your mental health journey, there are options for you! Hopefully this information helped clarify the levels of mental health care available.

Need help in finding programs near you? Click here.

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23

Stressed? Take a Step Outside

Posted by Collaborative Counseling
yellow flowers with a view of mountains outside
Spending time outside can greatly reduce stress levels and improve physical health. #outdoors #healthyliving #mentalhealth

Life is stressful. For most people, the term ‘stressful’ is a major understatement to say the least. From work to studying to being home with kids or whatever your day consists of, it’s often tough to relax. Taking a moment out of your day to step outside and enjoy nature can ease some of that!

Here is a look into what happens in your body when you are in natural spaces:

  • Lowered cortisol levels – when your cortisol levels are constantly raging, like in periods of high stress, there is more risk for depression/anxiety, weight gain, trouble focusing, and issues with your heart
  • Lower blood pressure – the fresh air and view of nature help in keeping your heart and mind healthy
  • Better sleep – spending time outside helps people not only get a deeper sleep, but sleep longer through the night
  • Improved immune system – being outside exposes your body to a wide variety of healthy bacteria that work to improve your bodies natural defenses
  • Increased exercise – people are more likely to get moving when they spend time outside whether that is walking/biking/swimming/etc which is always great for you as a whole

There are many ways that immersing yourself in nature can get you that much needed break! Not sure where to start? Walk through a local park on your lunch break. Maybe go for a bike ride with a friend. Even having a view of natural environments or plants in your house can make a difference!

It’s time get serious about caring for the bodies we live in every day. Take that step outside and enjoy the warm summer weather that is just around the corner! (But don’t forget your sunscreen!)

Want to learn more? Click here.

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16

Mental Health IS Health

Posted by Collaborative Counseling
Growing Plant Symbolizing Hope for Depression

When we think of being healthy, often it is physical health that comes to mind. Too often, we put our mental health on the back burner in life.  However, our mental and physical health are one in the same. It’s what we call the mind-body connection.

What is the Mind-Body Connection?

According to the University of Minnesota, the mind-body connection refers to the relationship between our attitudes, thoughts, feelings and actions and our biological functioning. Basically, our minds can affect how healthy our bodies are and vice versa. This affect can be negative or positive. It is important to note that when talking about the mind, we are not referring to the brain. Rather, the mind is made up of our mental states which can be both conscious and unconscious and include thoughts, feelings, emotions. A perfect example of the mind-body connection is anxiety. When we are anxious our body releases stress hormones which affect our overall biological functioning. For example, some people report that when they are anxious they experience tension in their shoulders, back or abdomen.

How to Strengthen Your Mind-Body Connection

There are several ways to promote a healthy mind-body connection. Self-care activities such as exercise, yoga, and meditation can promote a healthy body which in turn, promotes a mental state. There are several different therapies that also emphasize the mind-body connection and can help to promote a healthy mental state which encourages a healthy body. These include cognitive behavioral therapy, mindfulness-based therapies and art therapy.

Try to incorporate some time for intentional movement in your day. This can be as small as a walk on your lunch break or using an app to help you meditate for a few minutes a day. Being aware of our thoughts, attitudes and feelings as well as taking the time to take care of and move our bodies is key to a positive mind-body connection.

To learn more about the mind-body connection visit: https://www.takingcharge.csh.umn.edu/what-is-the-mind-body-connection

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What is the Difference Between Depression and Mourning?

Posted by Collaborative Counseling
Depression & Alzheimer's

Depression Versus Mourning

Depression and mourning hold a lot of similarities. However, depression is different from mourning. Mourning is viewed as a longer, ongoing sadness that impacts the person’s ability to function effectively in life. Everyone mourns differently. Therefore, someone in mourning could potentially meet the criteria for a Major Depressive Episode. With this in mind, maybe we haven’t given enough thought to whether some people who are depressed are grieving a loss of some kind.

One In the Same?

In a recent conversation with a friend, she posed the question: Is depression a type of mourning? Maybe some people with depression are grieving the way they wish things were. We do know that depressed people tend to view the world in more negative ways. However, maybe it goes deeper than that.

Maybe, the negativity we see in the thinking of depressed people is about their grief and loss of relationships or career dreams. Maybe, even family ideals or visions of success they saw for themselves.

Of course, by no means do I suggest everyone who is depressed is grieving or in mourning. However, I do believe that some people may be.

Ultimately, depression varies in how it develops and presents for each individual. I think the thoughts above remind us to treat each person as an individual. By better understanding those in mourning and in depression, we can undoubtedly better help them to overcome their struggles.

Learn more at: https://www.collaborativemn.com/counseling-services/individual-counseling

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